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Dragon Spa – Korean Sauna

7 Dec

Jjimjilbang is Korean traditional sauna.

Nowadays Korean jjimjulbang is changing to multi playground for families and couples.

Dragon Spa is one of the jjimjulbangs you can enjoy in Seoul City

because there are sauna, swimming pool, digital game zone, fitness club and restaurant.

Visit Dragon Spa if you want to experience real korean life with your friends or family.

Cost: Adult – 12,000 won

           Children – 6,000 won

Available Time: 24hours

Location: Drangonhills Spa   40-713   Hangangro3ga   Yonghanju   Seoul

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Celebrate “finished a course” PARTY

23 Nov

I hope to invite u!

We make plan to party in club volume 2010/12/23

If  you want go there, contact me!

I will give a free entrance ticket(and 1 free drink)  for you.

In originally, price will be 30000won!

But if you contact me, that will be free!

welcome 🙂

Samcheong-Dong ‘Slow Garden’

23 Nov

 

 

Click and get more details…

 

Address: 15-1, Samcheon-Dong, Jongro-Gu, Seoul, Korea.
Phone: 82-2-737-7187
Valet parking available : 2,000 won for 2 hours.
Homepage: N/A

hallow’s eve

23 Nov

I join a circle that making a party! (party plan team in CAU : IM)

Homepage adress is club.cyworld.com/imofcau

we had make a halloween party when it is 2010.10.30

It was so succecsful! 🙂

We did promotion at CAU campus and another univ. (ex: hong-ik univ.)

Lot of peaple did come our party! (aproximatly 700) 

More deteil information ↓

2010/10/30/ sat 10:pm~6:00am

club ark lounge (chung dam)

price 30000won / presale, ticket 15000won (vodka + snack free refill)

DJ line up : DJ D FINGER, WU, SOUL

Hakrim Dabang_Coffee with tradition

22 Nov

Today I’m going to introduce about Seoul’s old school coffee shop, “Dabang. ”

Hakrim is perhaps Seoul’s most famous Dabang which maintains original old style, dark wood interior. It was established in 1956 and has refused to be re-branded like today’s café.

Entrance of Hakrim

Korea’s students struggling for democracy used to discuss philosophy, literature and art at this place. The phrase on the sign indicates that.

Old stairs

original old style, dark wood interior.

Antique decorartions

 

Faded posters

Old lecord, Classical music comes out. Sometimes on CD, sometimes on vinyl.



Hand-dripped coffee, Well-known cheese cake.

  • T.02) 742-2877
  • Open : 10:20am-midnight
  • Getting there : Hyehwa station, Line4, Exit3. Turn 180 degrees at the top og the exit and head north. Hakrin dabang soon appears on the left.
  • Free wireless internet is available.

Korean game (Go-Stop)

22 Nov

Go-Stop is a Korean card game. These cards are referred to as hwatu in Korean. Go-Stop is played with Hanafuda cards using a different point system. In addition, a deck of Korean hwa-tu cards usually includes bonus cards. Typically, there are two or three players. The general point of this game is to score points, usually three or seven, and then call a “Go” or a “Stop.” When a “Go” is called, the game continues, and the amount of points or money is first increased, and then doubled, tripled, quadrupled and so on. If a “Stop” is called, the game ends and the winner collects their winnings.

In order to select a dealer, each player picks random cards from the deck and the person with the latest month becomes the dealer (months of the cards are shown under the card section in Hanafuda). Before the cards are dealt, the dealer shuffles the cards by holding the deck in the left hand with the cards face-down and pulling out random stacks of cards with the right hand to stack them on top. The dealer must repeat this process several times in order to shuffle the cards sufficiently. After shuffling, the dealer holds the deck out to the player to their right in order for them to cut the deck. If there are only two players, the opponent cuts the deck.

THE DEAL:

Two players: The dealer places four cards face-up on the table then deals five cards to their opponent’s hand and five cards to their hand. Then, the dealer places another four cards face-up on the table and deals another five cards to each player’s hand, starting with the opponent.
Three players: The dealer places three cards face-up on the table then deals four cards to each player’s hand, starting with the player to the right and continuing counterclockwise. Then, the dealer places another three cards face-up on the table and deals another three cards to each player’s hand, again starting with the player on the right.[1]
The remaining cards are placed face down on top of the cut portion of the deck in the center of the table to form a draw pile. Before the play begins, the players check for sets of two, three or four cards of the same month on the table. If there is a set, they pile it up on top of each other, usually leaving space on each of the top part of the cards.

Gameplay

1. Play begins with the dealer and continues counterclockwise.

2. A turn begins with a player attempting to match one of the cards lying face-up on the table with a card of the same month in their hand (cf. Hanafuda). If there are two cards of the same month already on the table, the player may select one of them. If the player has no cards matching the cards on the table, the player discards a card to the table.

3. The turn continues with the player flipping over the top card from the draw pile and looking for a card of the same month on the table. If the player locates a matching card on the table, the player collects both cards along with the cards matched in step 2. Otherwise, the drawn card is added to the table.

4. If the card drawn from the top of the draw pile in step 3 matches the two cards matched in step 2, the three cards remain on the table. This is known as ppeok. The three cards remain until a player collects them using the fourth card of the same month.

5. If a player draws a card which matches the card discarded in step 2, the player collects both cards as well as one junk card (pi) from each opponent’s stock pile. This is known as chok .

6. If a player plays a card in step 2 for which two matching cards are already on the table, and then draws the fourth matching card from the draw pile in step 3, the player collects all four cards as well as one junk card (pi) from each opponent’s stock pile. This is known as ttadak.[2]

7. The object of the game is to create scoring combinations to accumulate points up to a score of either three (for three players) or seven (for two players), at which point a “Go” or a “Stop” must be called.

Additional Rules

Any player who has a set of three cards of the same month in their hand can show them to the other players in what is referred to as “shaking” the cards, or heundeum. For each time a player shakes within a single hand, final points are doubled in the event that that player wins the hand.
If a player has as set of three cards of the same month in their hand and the fourth card of that month is located on the table, the player may play all three cards in one turn and collect all four cards as well as one junk card (pi) from each player’s stock pile. This is known as a poktan (meaning “bomb”). Shaking the cards before playing a poktan is also an option. A player who has played a poktan may then choose to skip step 2 above in as many as two turns (i.e. the player’s turn consists only of drawing one card from the draw pile).
Any player who has a set of four cards of the same month can show them to the other players and win the hand immediately.
If there is a set of three cards of the same month on the table, they are combined into one stack. The player who collects the pile using the fourth card of that month will also collect one junk card (pi) from each player’s stock pile.
If there is a set of four cards of the same month on the table, the cards are reshuffled and redealt by the same dealer.
If there is a bonus card on the table during initial deal, the dealer collects the bonus card and turns the top card of the draw pile face-up and places it on the table.
If a player is dealt a bonus card, they may add it to their stock pile at the beginning of any turn and draw a card from the draw pile to replace it in their hand.
If a player draws a bonus card from the draw pile during their regular turn, they will automatically collect it along with any other cards matched during that turn, except in the event of a ppeok, in which all four cards (i.e. the three cards invlolved in the ppeok plus the bonus card) must remain on the table.

Point System

light cards (gwang): One way to accumulate points in Go-Stop is to collect Bright cards (gwang). When three gwang other than that of the month of November (referred to as bi gwang, bi meaning “rain”) are collected, this is known as “Three Brights” (sam gwang) and is worth three points. However, if the Three Brights include bi gwang, this is called “Wet Three Brights” (bi sam gwang), and is worth two points. When four gwang other than bi gwang are collected, this is called “Four Brights” (sa gwang), and is worth five points. When the Four Brights include bi gwang, this is called “Wet Four Brights” (bi sa gwang) and is worth four points. When all five gwang are collected, this is called “Five Brights” (o gwang) and is worth fifteen to fifty points depending on house rules.

Ribbon cards (tti): Another way to accumulate points is through Ribbon cards. A set of any five Ribbon cards is worth one point, and each additional Ribbon card after five is worth one additional point. For example, a set of six Ribbon cards is worth two points and a set of seven Ribbon cards is worth three points. In addition to this, points may also be accumulated by collecting three matching Ribbon cards. There are three blue Ribbon cards (cheong dan), three red Ribbon cards with poetry (hong dan), and three red Ribbon cards without poetry (cho dan) (this excludes the Ribbon card for the month of December, which is also red and without poetry). Each of these combinations is worth three points. Moreover, the two methods of accumulating points via Ribbon cards are combined. If a player collects six Ribbon cards, including all three red Ribbons and all three blue Ribbons, the player can claim three points for hong dan, three points for cheong dan, and an additional two points for having six Ribbon cards, for a total of eight points.

Animal cards (dongmul): A third way to accumulate points is by collecting Animal cards. The scoring system of Animal cards is quite similar to that of Ribbon cards. A set of any five Animal cards is worth one point, and each additional Animal card after five is worth an additional one point. For example, a set of six Animal cards is worth two points, and a set of seven Animal cards is worth three points. In addition to this, if among the Animal cards, a special set of three cards made up of the Geese, the Cuckoo and the Nightingale is collected, this set is called godori (meaning “five birds”) and is worth five points (even though the Animal card from the month of November also features a bird, it is excluded as with the Bright cards and the Ribbon cards). Both methods of scoring are combined, as with the Ribbon cards. Thus, if a player collects six Animal cards, including godori, the player can claim five points for godori, and two additional points for having six Animal cards, for a total of seven points.

Junk cards (pi) The fourth and most common way to accumulate points is by collecting junk cards. Any set of ten junk cards is worth one point and each additional card after ten is worth an additional one point. In addition, there are special junk cards called Double Junks (ssang pi), which are counted as two junk cards. Also, the bonus cards mentioned above are also usually counted as two junk cards.

When a player accumulates at least three (for three players) or seven (for two players) points, the player must decide if they will continue that hand by calling “Go,” or end the hand by calling “Stop.” If a player says “Go” once, the player must increase their score by at least one point in order to be given another opportunity to call “Go” or “Stop.” A player who calls “Go” once has one point added to their final score. With two “Go”s, two points are added. With the third “Go,” the score is doubled. After the third “Go” (in which the score is multiplied by two), the score is multiplied by the number one less than the number of times the winner has called “Go.” However, before calling “Go,” the winner must consider whether another player may increase their score to at least three or seven points within the next turn.

When “Stop” is called, any non-winning players who have called “Go” will have their penalty (calculated from the winning player’s total points) doubled. This is called go bak. If a non-winning player has no Bright cards when the winner has accumulated points by collecting Bright cards, the player without Bright cards will have their penalty doubled. This is known as gwang bak. Further, if a non-winning player has fewer than six junk cards and the winner has accumulated points by collecting junk cards, the non-winning player will have their penalty doubled. This is known as pi bak. All of these are cumulative.

As an example, if a player accumulates seven or more points through only Ribbon cards and Animal cards, the player may then call “Go.” If, however, before the first player is given another opportunity to call “Go” or “Stop” another player accumulates at least seven points through both Bright cards and junk cards and subsequently calls “Stop,” the first player would be subject to go bak, gwang bak and pi bak. Thus, the player’s penalty would be doubled three times, in other words, multiplied by eight.

Seoul Top Mountain

22 Nov

<Mt. Bukhansan>

This dramatic rocky peaks in northern Seoul are declared as a national park. Insubong peak is one of the most popular rock-climbing locations in Korea. Several Buddhist temples are also located here, including the major Zen center of Hwagyesa Temple.

Getting there

  • Hajurae course: Suyu station, Line 4. Take bus 6,6-1, 0r 8 to its final destination.
  • Daeseongmun course: Sungshin Women’s University station, Line 4. Take bus 1, 3, 5-1, 16 or 710 to final destination.
  • Bibong cours : Jonggak station, Line 1. Take bus 428 from jongno 1-ga and get off at Gugi Tunnel Entrance Police Box.

<Mt. Gwanaksan>

This gentle massif in southern Seoul offers splendid views of the Gangnam area and Hangang river. Especially the view from Yeonjubong(the mountain’s highest peak) is dramatic.

Getting there

  • Seoul National University Station, Line2. Then take bus 25,55-2,94,95,114,121,142,289,289-1 or to 303 entrance of Seoul National University.

<Mt. Namsan>

Mt. Namsan is perhaps the most famous mountain in Seoul. The landmark N Seoul Tower which is located on mountain’s summit is really famous tour course in Seoul. This peak is low(262m) and gentle, so anyone can climb, and enjoy the view of urban below.

Getting there

  • Dongguk University Station, Line e, Exit 6. Take the Namsan loop bus to the National Theather of Korea.

<Mt. Inwangsan>

A sacred mountain in Korean shamanism. Guksadang is Korea’s most important shamanist shrine, located on this mountain. Seonbawi is an unusual rock formation that also serves as a site of shamanist rites.

Getting there

  • Dongnimmun Station, Line 3, Exit2

<Mt. Dobongsan>

Mt. Dobongsan is technically part of Mt. Bukhansan. Usually treated as a seperated hiking course. Like Mt. Bukhansan, it is a dramatically rocky mountain. Seoninbong peak is famous among climbers. There are 60 temples, including Cheonchuksa, Mangwolsa, Ssangyongsa and Hoeryongsa.

Getting there

  • Jureng course : Hoeryong station, Line1
  • Mangwolsa course : Mangwolsa station, Line1
  • Dobong-dong course : Dobongsan station, Line1